Architecting Culture at Scale

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Last week, we proudly welcomed Angus Dorney to the Kablamo family.  In his blog post, Angus did an awesome job expressing the significance of his joining, and the much-needed step-change that Kablamo brings to enterprise. We're on the precipice of something new, something great, it's a very exciting time for us.

But thanks to his inherent humility, Angus did a pretty darn average job of expressing one of the more outstanding gifts he brings to us.  Please allow me to explain. 

Angus is known industry-wide for his effectiveness as a tech leader, but what truly distinguishes him in my opinion is his ability to maintain culture at scale.  Angus knows how to grow a business, just Google his name to see a shopping list of distinguished achievements. But he also knows a much more profound thing, how to grow a great culture that matches business growth.  

"Company Culture” these days is 101 level HR marketing fodder, an afterthought. The ideal of company culture is too often tossed around as a concept that sounds great but doesn’t necessarily mean much. 

Kablamo is built around our humans.  We didn’t buy them.  We gravitated together because we share a single vision, we have a single purpose: Deliver cloud software in a way that absolutely knocks the socks off our loyal enterprise customers.  We don’t have dispensable people any more than we have dispensable ethics or values.  Our humans are exceptionally bright and deliver outcomes with unwavering humility. We don’t need or want undeserved monikers like “we’re the best”, “the biggest”, “the fastest”, “the most cloudiest/devopsiest/secopsiest” — we just get on with it. Our team builds really valuable software, we solve problems.  We work really hard, but we maintain balance —and we don’t just say it, we do it. And we enjoy it. 

Our new Co-CEO embodies the ideal of servant leadership. Angus is the safe pair of hands to grow something culturally unique like Kablamo into something much bigger. What’s so critical here is that scaling the Kablamo culture will mean huge benefits for organisations looking for a trusted accountable partner to drive truly valuable enterprise solutions at scale. (Just for fun , try saying that 5 x with a mouth full of marbles)

So, welcome, Angus.  Kablamo’s culture is on the launch pad for the next stage of our journey and the mission is clear.

— Allan Waddell, Co-CEO (Proudly) and Founder Kablamo

Why The Technology Behind Bitcoin May Someday Save Your Life

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Allan wrote the following piece for CSO.  You can also read it there.

It’s time to chin up and stop grousing that we’re all late to the crypto-currency party. Most of us may have missed our moment to make millions off of Bitcoin, but the technology behind it could eventually save our lives. 

This potential is likely behind the government’s recent decision to use the budget to set aside $700,000 for the Digital Transformation Agency (DTA) to “investigate areas where blockchain technology could offer the most value for government services.” It doesn’t sound like much, but it’s a start that other many other nations haven’t made.

While the early arrivals to Bitcoin may be having more fun financially than the rest of us, the cryptocurrency frenzy is rapidly changing from a gold rush-themed greed-fest to a surprise party: turns out that blockchain, the technology behind Bitcoin and dozens of other cryptocurrencies, has untold practical and even altruistic uses, from making food safer to boosting humanitarian aid; from improving electric grids to safeguarding workers’ rights.

Blockchain creates a shared digital ledger, an open book whose decentralised information can’t be altered or hacked.  This transparency and stability is where the potential lies.

In April, Blackmores, the natural food company, and Australia Post announced that they are teaming up with China’s Alibaba in a new Food Trust Network to develop a food tracing technology using blockchain. The world’s largest dairy exporter, New Zealand’s Fonterra, will also participate in the network, as will that country’s postal system. The project will start with Blackmores’ fish oil and Fonterra’s Anchor products.

In mere seconds, their system will be able to track food from the store shelf to the farm and shipment it came from, thanks to special codes on the food’s packaging.

The system has enormous potential to address health threats in our food supply in ways that could actually save lives.

For example, seven deaths and a miscarriage were linked in recent months to listeria-tainted rockmelon grown in New South Wales. After the first death, in mid-January, it took authorities working without benefit of blockchain about 40 days to find and contain the source; by then a total of 19 people would be affected.

Granted, even with blockchain, this particular outbreak would have been hard to trace. That’s because listeria symptoms can take months to emerge, shrinking the likelihood that victims will remember what they ate or where they bought it. Blockchain can’t work its rapid magic, remember, if the label is long gone or the store is forgotten.

 Even so, once the grower was known, the technology would have helped authorities instantly pinpoint which stores sold the grower’s melons and when; possibly even to whom. Given that the melons were sold throughout Australia and exported to nine  countries, that would have been a good thing.

The U.S. is experiencing a similar food health crisis with romaine lettuce. Dozens of  people have developed kidney failure from an E. coli outbreak tied to romaine lettuce. Authorities still haven’t found the source and are warning people against eating any romaine lettuce until they do. Twelve years ago, spinach with E. coli killed three Americans outright and authorities spent weeks afterward trying to figure out where the deadly stuff was grown and packed.

The technology has already proven to have profound benefits in humanitarian ways. The World Food Programme recently began using it to distribute food aid to Syrian refugees in a Jordan refugee camp.No digital middleman is needed to broker transactions, and there are no fees. For that reason, refugees shop at the camp’s ‘food market’ and at checkout, a biometric scanner charges the WFP for their selections. Meanwhile, the blockchain safeguards the refugees’ identities, eliminating paperwork. The Danish Foreign Ministry says it might soon disburse all of its humanitarian aid in this way. And when a British charity recently used blockchain to send aid to some Swaziland schools, Reuters reported that the savings paid a year’s tuition for three additional students.

It’s the decentralised and transparent aspect of the technology that has the potential to make power grids ‘smarter.’ By eliminating the need for a single centralised server, everyone on a network can share information simultaneously, which will make it possible to detect problems faster when power grids fail. One day blockchain may also be able to distinguish clean energy in the grid from that derived from fossil fuels. This will make it easy for governments to track how much of it is generated and used. And Western Australia’s PowerLedger is trying to use blockchain to disrupt energy retailing and permit the rise of the “prosumer” (the energy producer/consumer) by giving them the tools to trade power.

And just last month, the U.S. State Department and Coca-Cola Co. announced a plan to fight hidden forced labor in countries where the beverage giant gets its sugar cane. The notion is to rely on the tamper-proof aspect of blockchain to create a workers’ registry that also tracks workers’ contracts with employers. Such a registry can’t force companies to honour their promises, but at least there’d be evidence of what those promises were.

To be sure, there’s a downside to the technology, which is that it requires massive amounts of energy to work its magic. But computer scientists from the MIT and other universities are racing to develop greener varieties.

Too bad all this potential for good is so often obscured by all the hoopla over blockchain’s profit-making potential. As one U.S. enthusiast, Naval Ravikant, said, it’s truly a shame that this technology of trust burst on the scene “dressed up as a get-rich-quick scheme.”

So relax. You’re not late to the most important party. It’s only just getting started, and with the right initiatives and policy, it will benefit everyone in ways we can’t even imagine yet. 

Why I’m joining Kablamo

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Today, I join a special group of people who are creating a truly amazing company. In a short period of time, Allan Waddell and his team at Kablamo have built a strong reputation in the Australian cloud marketplace – they’re known for delivering high impact customer outcomes, making Agile more than just a buzzword, and for being some of Australia’s smartest cloud and application engineers.

In short, Kablamo is a leader in  a new generation of cloud application partners.

Most enterprise IT service providers say people are their most important asset, but very few practice what they preach. They talk about delivering outcomes for customers but end up only delivering big invoices. They claim to put the customer at the core of their delivery, but don’t take time to really understand their customers’ needs and match these needs with relevant and modern service offerings. In every case, Kablamo is different.

And people are taking notice.

It isn’t often that you get a chance to be a part of the next big thing. I believe Kablamo is that next big thing.  In less than two years, Kablamo already counts some of Australia’s largest organisations as customers. Kablamo’s team are execution engineers, “black ops” code warriors who deliver and educate, working on site with customers and enabling their organisations to move faster via the speed and quality of delivery.  This combination of getting important things done securely and rapidly, whilst investing their customers with lasting cloud knowledge, means  customer teams inherit the capabilities they need to make the most of cloud.  The reputation for delivering, for guiding customers along their cloud journey, is the reason such an impressive list of enterprises already work with Kablamo. 

When I spend time with Kablamo people, I see common traits of humility, accountability, curiosity, creativity and bravery. I see values that align with my own and values upon which we can build a truly world class business.

Today is another step forward in Kablamo’s journey to reshape what customers expect from their technology and cloud partners.  

I am honoured and grateful for the opportunity to partner with Allan, as Co-Chief Executive Officers of Kablamo, and to take this young organisation forward on an exciting mission. I look forward to working with many of the people I have met on my journey so far and I equally look forward to meeting new people and organisations. I have no doubt that today marks the beginning of a fulfilling new chapter in my story, and I look forward to sharing the ride with you all.

-- Angus Dorney, Co-CEO Kablamo

Is your computer a racist? We know AI’s ‘how’ but we need ‘why’

Is your computer a racist? We know AI’s ‘how’ but we need ‘why’

As more decisions are handed over to AI, regulating their behaviour could become increasingly important. Part of the challenge stems from the fact that while we can understand “how” an AI has reached a certain conclusion, discovering the “why” is much more problematic.

COMMON HURDLES OF DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION IN ENTERPRISE

COMMON HURDLES OF DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION IN ENTERPRISE

Kablamo's Founder and CEO shares his experiences of the common obstacles facing digital transformation within enterprise organisations - and how to overcome these.