Bring Your Humans...

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If you want a tech transformation.

Transformations are disruptive. I don’t mean this in the lazy, cliched, and sigh-inducing “X company is the Uber of Y industry, poised to disrupt the industry”, I mean it is a process of change that requires some adaptation.

Digital transformations involve overhauling processes and reimagining how an organisation does business. It’s not as simple as calling in a carpenter to renovate the office kitchen - although this too can cause some disruption - because transformations are underpinned by an aspirational vision of what the organisation could be.

This desired future state, by its very nature, is disconnected from the organisation’s current reality. It is this disconnect that is the cause of most of the disruption. Humans, being creatures of habit, become accustomed to doing things in a certain way - in a business context, this means using certain programs, processes, or resources to achieve a particular task. Transformation projects aim to overhaul this status quo and ultimately give a workforce access to tools to make it more efficient, more collaborative, and more responsive to change.  

While these are all noble aims, an organisation’s humans must be brought along for the journey so they understand why this transformation is taking place and what that desired future state looks like.

A people-first focus enables you to really listen, to ask the right questions and discover exactly what an organisation needs. This open and frank communication - devoid of any preconceptions - allows you to intimately understand what the organisation actually desires to achieve.

This free-flow of information is something we encourage our clients to undertake with their staff during a digital transformation. It is a disruptive time for any organisation, but below are a few tips to ensure employees understand what changes are coming and - most importantly - why they’re coming;   

  • Collaborative Enthusiasm. During a transformative project, every employee has a role to play and needs to be ready to collaborate across teams and disciplines. For example, the marketing team may need to start promoting the tech transformation before it’s implemented, and needs to mesh with the IT team to make sure their message is accurate and timely. Make these roles clear, and ensure the teams understand what they need to do and why they need to do it.

  • Common Vision. Building enthusiasm and cross-department collaboration is far more successful when the entire enterprise shares a common vision and understanding of the project. Outlining the project and its goals in a product development framework document is one important way for key stakeholders to gain an overview of the project and to communicate the cogent information effectively to employees.

  • Technical Skill. This encompasses not only the skills and knowledge of your employees but also your managers’ ability to evaluate potential vendors and the tech they’re providing. Sometimes the “best-dressed” vendor isn’t the best choice for a project; do your people have the knowledge to determine this? It is important to have an honest conversation with your technical team before evaluating any transformation initiative - what skills do they have and where are the blind spots?

These components won’t fall into place overnight. They require planning and a clear view of the organisation’s strategy and desired future state, but each needs to be addressed. Ask the hard questions: Do your people have the technical skill required for their particular piece of the project? Are they excited to join in the process of transforming your enterprise’s technology? Does everyone share the vision of the enterprise’s future that this technology will usher in?

Also apply these concepts when choosing vendors or consultants, who each contribute a piece to the overall project. How well do they know the product or technology they’re working with? Are they enthusiastic about the project and able to collaborate effectively with your humans? Inasmuch as you can share the details of the project with them, do they understand their role in making the company’s vision become a reality?

Evaluate the answers to these questions before launching a project, and return to them periodically throughout the process to make sure your people’s skill sets, enthusiasm, knowledge and collaboration - as well as those of your technology providers - are on track.

After all, technology is only as effective as the people using it. Bringing your people onboard early in the process ensures your organisation can navigate the coming changes as seamlessly as possible.