cloud strategy

Kablamo Appoints Kirsty Trask To Leadership Team

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Great to see ARN and others cover Kirsty’s arrival at Kablamo as regional manager for Melbourne and a welcome addition to our leadership team. All the better because it’s International Women’s Day. Here’s an excerpt from the story:

Cloud software and product developer Kablamo has appointed Kirsty Trask as its regional manager Melbourne.

Trask joins from call recording services provider Dubber where she was a senior product manager.

In her new role at Kablamo, she will oversee the growth across Victoria, software and product development and also coaching teams within client organisations to "adopt and embrace an Agile culture".

Kablamo co-CEO Angus Dorney said Trask’s experience in managing high-performance teams and track record delivering innovative software-centric solutions made her the perfect fit.

“I didn’t want to hire someone with just ‘go-to-market’ experience, that’s a dime-a-dozen,” Dorney said. “I wanted someone who was more strategic, had experience with software and product strategy, someone who can lead the customer journey from a blank sheet of paper all the way through to taking a new product to market."

Trask is a member of the Australian Computer Society’s Women in Victoria Group, and has also worked to encourage more women to pursue careers in technology as part of Females in Information Technology and Telecommunications (FITT).

Read the full story on ARN here.

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My Business Talks To Allan --Entrepreneur reveals: ‘Why I hired a co-CEO’

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Kablamo co-CEO and Founder, Allan Waddell, recently appeared in MyBusiness to talk about the experience of going from solo to co-CEO. Full story below or you can read it on MyBusiness

It’s said to be lonely at the top when running a business, but as this business owner explains, appointing a co-CEO can be a beneficial way of positioning the company, and oneself, for growth.

Allan Waddell (pictured, left) founded Kablamo, a cloud software development firm, in May 2017, having previously built and sold another business. And, as he admits, he naturally gravitated towards the actual work of the business more than the running of the business itself, especially managing its finances.

For a mixture of business and personal reasons, he decided not to continue running Kablamo alone. So, mid last year, he took the plunge and appointed a co-CEO, Angus Dorney.

My Business spoke with Mr Waddell to find out why he took this approach, whether it has been worthwhile and what insights he can share from his journey so far.

Why did you decide to take on a co-CEO?

Someone wise once said to me, “You’ll be happiest at work when you are kicking goals doing what you do well”. Having already built and sold another consulting business, I knew what my strengths were, but most importantly I knew where I needed support.

When it comes to the technical, product development and sales sides of the business, I’m completely in my element. But I always knew I’d feel more comfortable if I had someone handling the financial and operations aspects of Kablamo.

That’s what makes Angus such a perfect fit; I come up with the ideas and he executes them.

How long did it take you to make that decision?

In the past, I’ve been bitten by having too much undeserved confidence in my leadership team, so since starting Kablamo, I have been aligning myself with mentors and leaders whom I’d one day think could make the leap from mentor to business partner.

Angus is someone I’ve known and respected for a long time, and we were both considering the opportunity for more than a year.

What fears did you have about the move, and how have/are you allaying those fears?

Leadership, and leader change, makes a team nervous. The Kablamo team is made up of incredibly smart people, but smart people naturally have a great deal of self-awareness, which can go hand in hand with self-doubt.

Bringing highly skilled and experienced oversight can sometimes trigger defensive behaviour and fear. Because of this, I didn’t expect the team to trust a new leader immediately, but with Angus, I already knew he would be a great fit culturally, so I could see trust on the horizon.

Did you hunt more widely for the ideal candidate before making the appointment?

I knew Kablamo would benefit from having someone drive the operational side of the business.

Having known Angus for sometime, he was always at the top of my list to share the helm with me at Kablamo — not only is he a great human being, but you’d be hard pressed to find someone with the wealth of experience he has.

He was a perfect fit, both in terms of his skills and how he fit into Kablamo culturally.

What has having a co-CEO enabled you to do so far that you would have been restricted from by flying solo?

Personally, the biggest benefits of having Angus as co-CEO is that I now have more time and our team has more executive skills.

While leading Kablamo by myself, I was in charge of everything — from business management, HR and sales to account management and operations.

Having Angus oversee the operations and financial side of Kablamo gives me more time to focus on building our vision — both from a business and product standpoint — as well as ensuring our culture is second to none.

What challenges have you faced in terms of decision-making and lines of authority, both from employees, clients and even between yourselves?

I anticipated some teething issues with bringing on a new leader, but the key to making this transition run as smoothly as possible was transparency. I was completely honest and up front with the team about why I was bringing Angus on board, and what responsibilities he would have in the business.

Equally, Angus and I clearly defined between ourselves how we would divide the CEO role.

Of course, at the start there were times when it was difficult to hand over control, but by communicating clearly and frequently, we’ve been able to solidify the relationship. When it comes to clients, Angus is well known and highly respected throughout the industry, so he was embraced almost instantly.

What challenges have arisen specifically because of the co-CEO model?

I won’t lie, the co-CEO model did take some getting used to. While I was leading Kablamo myself, I had the final say in everything and my decisions were largely made without scrutiny. With Angus, I now have eyeballs on me and my decisions, which I never had in the past.

While this was the whole idea of moving to the co-CEO model, the change from autonomy to observation was abrupt.

The key to addressing this, we’ve found, is clear and constant communication — if one of us doesn’t agree with the decision the other has made, we discuss it. We don’t let disagreements or clashes of opinion fester.

What advice would you give to other business leaders about the co-CEO model?

This model isn’t for everyone. If by nature you have counter-dependency issues, this power-sharing model will end your happiness.

There are a few key things to keep in mind if you want to explore the co-CEO model.

The first is to have a prior relationship with whoever you’re considering. If you already know much about how they work and how you each get along, you’ll have a greater insight into how the model will work in practice — without this, you’re basically crossing your fingers and hoping for the best.

Second, communication is absolutely critical. I can’t stress this enough. You both need to know exactly where you stand, and the only way to achieve this is to speak with each other frankly and frequently.

Finally, sharing for sharing’s sake will inevitably lead to complications. You must have clearly defined realms of responsibility. There will naturally be some overlap, but if you’re absolutely clear on what parts of the business fall under whose control, then each CEO is empowered to own their part.

How facial recognition can unlock video archive value

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Kablamo’s co-CEO, Angus Dorney, recently spoke to ComputerWorld about how facial recognition and AI can unlock tremendous amounts of value in video archives. Read the full story here. An excerpt is below.

Archive value

The capability also has enterprise applications – particularly for media organisations wanting to find relevant footage or stills in their video archives.

“They have millions of hours of video content and its typically stored in multiple legacy systems, there is no or varying meta-tagging, and the search processes for finding content are extremely old and they’re manual and they cut across multiple systems,” explains Angus Dorney, co-CEO of Sydney and Melbourne-based cloud technology firm Kablamo.

“If you’re a newsmaker in a media organisation or work for a government archive and somebody asks you for a specific piece of footage it’s very difficult and time consuming and expensive to try and find,” he adds.

Kablamo builds solutions that have a “YouTube-like user experience” to find relevant archive footage. Using AWS face and object recognition tools, users simply type in a person or thing “and get a list back of prioritised rankings, where it is, and be able to click and access that example right away,” Dorney – a former Rackspace general manager – says.

The machine learning models behind the capability, over time, can refine and adjust their behaviour, making results more accurate and more useful to users.

“You really have a computer starting to function like a human brain around these things which is incredibly exciting,” Dorney adds.

Bring Your Humans...

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If you want a tech transformation.

Transformations are disruptive. I don’t mean this in the lazy, cliched, and sigh-inducing “X company is the Uber of Y industry, poised to disrupt the industry”, I mean it is a process of change that requires some adaptation.

Digital transformations involve overhauling processes and reimagining how an organisation does business. It’s not as simple as calling in a carpenter to renovate the office kitchen - although this too can cause some disruption - because transformations are underpinned by an aspirational vision of what the organisation could be.

This desired future state, by its very nature, is disconnected from the organisation’s current reality. It is this disconnect that is the cause of most of the disruption. Humans, being creatures of habit, become accustomed to doing things in a certain way - in a business context, this means using certain programs, processes, or resources to achieve a particular task. Transformation projects aim to overhaul this status quo and ultimately give a workforce access to tools to make it more efficient, more collaborative, and more responsive to change.  

While these are all noble aims, an organisation’s humans must be brought along for the journey so they understand why this transformation is taking place and what that desired future state looks like.

A people-first focus enables you to really listen, to ask the right questions and discover exactly what an organisation needs. This open and frank communication - devoid of any preconceptions - allows you to intimately understand what the organisation actually desires to achieve.

This free-flow of information is something we encourage our clients to undertake with their staff during a digital transformation. It is a disruptive time for any organisation, but below are a few tips to ensure employees understand what changes are coming and - most importantly - why they’re coming;   

  • Collaborative Enthusiasm. During a transformative project, every employee has a role to play and needs to be ready to collaborate across teams and disciplines. For example, the marketing team may need to start promoting the tech transformation before it’s implemented, and needs to mesh with the IT team to make sure their message is accurate and timely. Make these roles clear, and ensure the teams understand what they need to do and why they need to do it.

  • Common Vision. Building enthusiasm and cross-department collaboration is far more successful when the entire enterprise shares a common vision and understanding of the project. Outlining the project and its goals in a product development framework document is one important way for key stakeholders to gain an overview of the project and to communicate the cogent information effectively to employees.

  • Technical Skill. This encompasses not only the skills and knowledge of your employees but also your managers’ ability to evaluate potential vendors and the tech they’re providing. Sometimes the “best-dressed” vendor isn’t the best choice for a project; do your people have the knowledge to determine this? It is important to have an honest conversation with your technical team before evaluating any transformation initiative - what skills do they have and where are the blind spots?

These components won’t fall into place overnight. They require planning and a clear view of the organisation’s strategy and desired future state, but each needs to be addressed. Ask the hard questions: Do your people have the technical skill required for their particular piece of the project? Are they excited to join in the process of transforming your enterprise’s technology? Does everyone share the vision of the enterprise’s future that this technology will usher in?

Also apply these concepts when choosing vendors or consultants, who each contribute a piece to the overall project. How well do they know the product or technology they’re working with? Are they enthusiastic about the project and able to collaborate effectively with your humans? Inasmuch as you can share the details of the project with them, do they understand their role in making the company’s vision become a reality?

Evaluate the answers to these questions before launching a project, and return to them periodically throughout the process to make sure your people’s skill sets, enthusiasm, knowledge and collaboration - as well as those of your technology providers - are on track.

After all, technology is only as effective as the people using it. Bringing your people onboard early in the process ensures your organisation can navigate the coming changes as seamlessly as possible.