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Have you got an “Innovation Killer” in your business? Here’s five dead giveaways

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Inertia has killed a lot of giants. The clients we work with know this. All of them are looking to overhaul their legacy processes, to implement new digital products and to use technology to better serve their clients. That said, an organisation's fate relies on its people, and one bad innovation apple can spoil the bunch – this bad apple is otherwise known as the dreaded “Innovation Killer.” 

The challenge is that Innovation Killers aren’t always obvious. They play it cool and practice passive resistance. They travel in stealth mode. They know that at the very least they must give lip service to the future, even while killing it in the crib.

The Innovation Killer is the opposite of an organisation’s "Change Agent” – that sunny innovation advocate who champions the push to implement new digital technologies. 

Luckily, years of delivering transformative projects have supplied our team with five phrases that we all agree are dead giveaways you’re dealing with an Innovation Killer.     

1. “We’ve tried that before, it didn’t work.” If a project didn’t work the first time, that doesn’t mean it won’t ever work. It might have been tried in the past, but never at this point in time, with this team, and this technology. If the previous attempt failed because of technical limitations, it’s possible those limitations have been addressed in subsequent releases or through entirely new offerings.     

2. “That’s not how we do it here.” Innovation by its very nature changes how things are done. Rather than think of how new digital products change current processes, they should be viewed through the prism of how they improve current processes.  

3. “We could do that ourselves.” If that were the case, it would already be done.

4. “That doesn’t fit with our policy.” Policies are written to help guide businesses; they’re not meant to be wielded as swords to cut down innovation. Good organisations update their policies as they grow and transform, because policies are written to fit the processes and capabilities of the time. Transformational digital products can only deliver their real value if they’re embraced by the whole business – this often means policies need to be updated to encompass the potential of the new technology.  

5. “People don’t like change.” This is perhaps the most common Innovation Killer phrase I hear, and it’s a red herring. It’s not change people fear, it’s loss. Truly innovative and transformational projects are a time of upheaval, but it’s an uplifting upheaval. Thankfully, while this is the most common objection, it’s also the easiest to address. Through good communication, taking the time to explain how much more efficient and productive they’ll be, and how the new technology simplifies their life and the lives of their customers, the Innovation Killer can be brought around.

When it comes to digital transformations, you can’t innovate without changing the status quo. In the face of this disruption, the organisation’s Innovation Killer will inevitably make themselves known and how you deal with them can make or break a project.

The good news is that the Innovation Killer isn’t a bad person (not most of the time anyway), they just have an attitude that isn’t particularly helpful. Whatever you do, don’t write them off or disregard them. By taking the time to understand the root of their reluctance, and addressing it, they can be converted. How to do that will be the subject of another post, but I'll say this, there’s no more powerful Change Agent than a reformed Innovation Killer.

On Kablamo, Melbourne and Life Decisions.

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Here’s the latest on Kabllamo’s culture, courtesy Daniel Serrano, who has just joined the team down in Melbourne!

Over a month has passed in the blink of an eye.

I told myself I’d take the time to reflect on my first weeks at Kablamo once I had a better handle on what it all meant: once I had met the team in person, seen the projects, processes and pipeline. 

After a sabbatical filled with travel, and the valuable life-lessons that come with it, I vowed to never again work for a company whose only focus was to monetise the lives of its employees. 

I was eager to join a team that hasn’t forgotten what made us choose technology over other career paths in the first place; that sense of wonder and discovery that makes you want to keep doing what you’re doing. Not because it pays the bills, but because it’s interesting and engaging.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not a naive idealist. I understand a business needs to be profitable, particularly if it cares about the wellbeing of its employees. What I mean is that there must be a beating heart behind every decision, paired with a vision that understands a good culture allows people to thrive and inspires them to grow to their full potential. 

That’s what I’ve found at Kablamo. It’s more than just a business. It’s a skills and talent amplifier where people are truly proud of their work and are always hungry to learn more.

During my four rounds of remote interviews, what I discovered was enough to convince me there is something special going on at Kablamo. Special enough to come back to Australia. To move across the world and take on a new challenge.

I had the chance to work with some of Kablamo’s founding members during my time at Nine Entertainment. The first thing that became apparent was that after a couple of years at Kablamo, all these already talented individuals had reached new levels, both technically and personally. 

This was the first sign that whatever was happening was something I wanted to be a part of.

One of my favourite things about our people is the obvious passion with which everyone approaches not only their work, but also their lives. Kablamo encourages a healthy work-life balance, but it seems most people here don’t make that hard distinction when it comes to sharing whatever exciting discoveries they run into. The breadth and depth of combined knowledge within our team is fertile ground for constant discussion and reflection on almost every aspect of technology applied to human existence.

You would think that with brains this big, enormous egos would follow, but that’s the other reason why I love Kablamo. It has put such care in the people they bring on board that our undisclosed “no asshole policy" is at the top of every hire. So, what has unfolded naturally is an environment where merit leads the conversation and where being humble is part of everyone’s DNA. This almost completely horizontal structure means the focus is to discover the heart of the problem first, then find the real solution. No holds barred. No excuses. 

Looking at the applications Kablamo has built for existing clients, I haven’t experienced this level of engineering since my days in San Francisco; solutions that speak to the merit and potential of technology, rather than to the terms of a business agreement. This is not a sales pitch. It’s the reality of working for a company focused on getting things done, rather than extracting as much money from its clients’ pockets as possible. In fact, at the core of the Kablamo Way is bringing our clients along on the transformation journey, helping them stand on their own two feet by delivering a product they can maintain and own. We don’t want to lock them down; we want to set them free. 

Week after week, I continue to be amazed by the team, the drive, the vision, and the balance that has allowed such a company to exist. (For more on this balance, see a recent writeup by one of our co-CEOs here).

With so much talent here, every day is another chance to learn and push myself further. Innovation is so rapid at Kablamo, I don’t want to blink in case I miss something.

- D.

Rise of the Mammal: the existential threat facing traditional consultancies

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Read Angus’s thoughts on traditional consultancies below (or read on TechDay here):

Business transformations are a challenging time for any organisation. During this time of relative vulnerability, many organisations turn to the major players for help – typically one of the big five consultancies.  

Very quickly, however, many businesses experience a disconnect between what they were promised and what is delivered. Common threads in these engagements are that the large firms over-promised, overcharged, underperformed, and often did so after agreed upon deadlines. 

Since starting Kablamo, a significant portion of our business has come from being called in to clean things up in the wake of these failed projects. In fact, these engagements happen so frequently we have our own internal name for them: “Rescue Missions”.

We recently partnered with UNSW Business School to investigate why this was happening so often. The initial qualitative research, in which we sought insights from some of Australia’s leading C-level executives, uncovered three key factors that contributed to failed transformation projects.

The first insight was that the traditionally dominant players, the big five consultancies, had struggled to adapt their business models for a changing technology landscape. In decades past, these consultancies had been engaged with primarily one outcome in mind – keeping costs down. In order to do so, they standardised their offerings around a limited number of services, essentially boiling down to variations of “lift and shift” outsourcing models. 

Today, however, businesses are looking for far more from their partners. They’re seeking innovative solutions that provide business differentiation, allow them to compete against industry disruptors, and future-proof their organisations. 

Critically, these solutions must be tailored to the specific needs and vision of the client. The big five consultancies struggle with the necessary customisation, the research found, because of their focus on standardised offerings. 

While this is a significant hurdle to overcome, and is a large contributor to failed transformation initiatives, the second factor the research identified was a lack of clear communication between partners and clients. Part of this breakdown in communication was attributed to the traditional view of IT as a cost centre. After engaging one of the large consultancies in an outsource project, rather than redeploy talent to more strategic initiatives, these staff members were often made redundant. The result of this, is a deficit in the technical and institutional knowledge required on the client side to effectively oversee and manage the partnership. This is particularly problematic during the initial stages of an engagement when contracts are being negotiated. 

By setting clear standards and expectations from the start, both parties have an interest in the relationship’s success because if the provider drops the ball, the client is empowered to move on to another partner. 

The final finding from the research was that a lack of clearly defined goals and metrics against which to measure the success of transformational projects hamstrung initiatives from the outset. 

With business today expecting more innovative solutions, measuring end-user experience or business performance is much more beneficial than the antiquated 99.XX% availability scores traditionally used to measure service provider relationships.

While proper measurement is important, clearly defined goals are perhaps most critical to the success of a project. Because the large consultancies have standardised their offerings, they struggle to investigate solutions outside of their standard services. 

This is where the new breed of smaller, more nimble consultancies thrive. Because they have the freedom and technical ability to consider all possible solutions, these newer players can take the time to intimately understand the client’s vision and find the best way to deliver exactly what they need. 

Part of the problem is that the large players are unwieldy and legacy-bound enterprises themselves. Generally speaking, enterprises are inefficient, so you end up in a position where an inefficient enterprise is trying to help another enterprise increase efficiency – it’s not going to end well.

As technology evolves, and business needs with them, the traditionally dominant consultancies face an existential crisis. Unless they learn to adapt, they risk sharing the fate of the dinosaurs. In their place, the smaller specialist players will thrive – their adaptable and nimble nature will see them mirror the rise of the mammals.   

The "Odd Couple" - my first year as co-CEO 

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One year ago, I made the biggest move of my career and joined Kablamo as co-CEO.

Not only was shared leadership new to me, but from the outset it was clear Allan and I were very different people.

Allan brings the creativity and technical vision to our team. His insights into areas like artificial intelligence and running Agile at scale are mind blowing, and the right kind of crazy. He can take the esoteric and make it accessible, pushing all of us to think deeper, farther.

My strengths? Let’s just say I leave that kind of creativity to Al. I know how to build and scale businesses, plan and execute strategies, and keep organisations and people happy as they strive for greatness.

Human instinct being what it is, the initial reaction is to push away from this kind of personal difference in a co-CEO model. It can be a scary leap into darkness for both people. The “visionary” can worry that the “manager” mind might over-manage and constrain —becoming an idea killer, a clipper of wings. On the other hand, the manager may worry that the visionary will be impossible to channel in a way that can deliver consistent customer outcomes and meet payroll each week!

Long story short, between my unfamiliarity with this shared approach, and the fact we’re both such polar opposites, I was nervous about what lay ahead.             

While I’ve started with the differences, for the co-CEO model to work there must be some critical similarities – similarities which are values-based, not financial. 

For Allan and I, nurturing a strong values-led culture at Kablamo is a principle neither of us will compromise on. We have rock solid alignment around the type of business we want to build, how we want to treat people and how we want to be treated in return. We’d rather walk away than build a shitty, transactional company and culture filled with uninspired people who are just there for a paycheck.

And this brings me to another critical point: Ego. A healthy confidence and belief is one thing, but for the co-CEO model to work, you need to have right-sized egos that are willing to accept imperfection, share success and to learn from failure. In that sense, it’s not for everyone. Needless to say, trust —and a lot of it— needs to be a big shared value between both leaders.

So, what’s been the result for Allan, myself and the Kablamo team in our first year as co-CEOs? By embracing our differences, Kablamo has grown far beyond what I thought possible when I first agreed to share the CEO role. Our varied skill sets allow us to focus on the areas we excel, which has helped lead to strong organisational growth. 

In fact, 12 months on, it’s clear our differences are one of the biggest benefits of this co-CEO model (in a future post, I plan on digging down into this a bit more).

Not only has our customer base significantly expanded to include some of Australia’s largest media, financial and industrial organisations, we’ve more than tripled our staff numbers to accommodate the demand.

While growth is important, what matters most to Allan and me is Kablamo’s culture. We’ve developed a strong set of values and a vision for our future. We’ve also grown and evolved our leadership group on our mission to become a high performing team. We’ve started our employee benefits program, and launched our giving arm, Kablamo Impact. We want to build a good company, not just a financially successful company.

Underpinning this all is our focus on building a world-beating culture. Our secret sauce is our people. Day-in and day-out, this team is delivering truly transformational digital products and outcomes in some of Australia’s largest and most well-known organisations.

And their hard work is being recognised. Earlier this year, we were named as finalists at AWS’s Partner of the Year awards for Data, Analytics and Machine Learning.

Now with a solid foundation built, and much more confidence in our shared leadership model, this next financial year will be the most exciting in our history… stay tuned.

Even if you’re not ready or convinced by the co-CEO path, consider giving shared leadership a try, if only in a limited way —sometimes going against your human instinct can pay off. 

Read on LinkedIn and connect with Angus f.

Amazon AWS Summit Intel

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Great to be able to share this from the AWS Summit and Paul Migliorini, Amazon Web Services’s ANZ lead (as reported by CRN, read the whole story here).

When asked whether AWS's largest partners like Accenture, Deloitte and DXC were getting in on the machine learning action as well, Migliorini said global systems integrators are investing heavily in those areas, but are working with consultancies of all sizes.

"You're looking at these organisations with really deep specific capabilities… Kablamo, DiUS, and Intellify, these sorts of companies… they're working with these larger integrators as well in that really cohesive way for customers. And I think that's one really nice thing about the evolution of the way the partner ecosystems are working today."

Miglironi wrapped up with his three key messages for the channel, which included his call for partners to challenge AWS harder.

"The first is that success will come from thinking long term about customer success, which means that putting a focus on outcomes, no matter how small project or revenue is, everyone will be rewarded by customers for the long term. So we want our partners together with us to think long term and to put customer outcomes ahead of any other short term game.

Kablamo Appoints Kirsty Trask To Leadership Team

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Great to see ARN and others cover Kirsty’s arrival at Kablamo as regional manager for Melbourne and a welcome addition to our leadership team. All the better because it’s International Women’s Day. Here’s an excerpt from the story:

Cloud software and product developer Kablamo has appointed Kirsty Trask as its regional manager Melbourne.

Trask joins from call recording services provider Dubber where she was a senior product manager.

In her new role at Kablamo, she will oversee the growth across Victoria, software and product development and also coaching teams within client organisations to "adopt and embrace an Agile culture".

Kablamo co-CEO Angus Dorney said Trask’s experience in managing high-performance teams and track record delivering innovative software-centric solutions made her the perfect fit.

“I didn’t want to hire someone with just ‘go-to-market’ experience, that’s a dime-a-dozen,” Dorney said. “I wanted someone who was more strategic, had experience with software and product strategy, someone who can lead the customer journey from a blank sheet of paper all the way through to taking a new product to market."

Trask is a member of the Australian Computer Society’s Women in Victoria Group, and has also worked to encourage more women to pursue careers in technology as part of Females in Information Technology and Telecommunications (FITT).

Read the full story on ARN here.

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Introducing Kombustion: Our Open Source AWS Developer Tool

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The team is proud to announce the launch of Kombustion.  Here's the media release, want to give Kombustion a try?  Visit: www.kombustion.io

Australia, August 15, 2018 – Kablamo has released its most significant open source software project to date, Kombustion. The AWS plugin provides an additional layer of intelligence for AWS CloudFormation, reducing the time and complexity of managing thousands of lines of code across AWS environments of any size. 

The tool provides benefits for developers and engineers who use AWS, as tasks that previously took days or weeks can now be completed in minutes or a few hours.  For example, setting up a new Virtual Private Cloud in an AWS cloud account has typically required significant work to define and manage up to 30 different AWS resources. With Kombustion, a best practice AWS Virtual Private Cloud can be set up with a small amount of configuration to an existing plugin.

“We developed Kombustion to help solve a common challenge for all AWS CloudFormation users. It was built in-house, and we’d been using it ourselves, but after seeing the benefits Kombustion delivered to our team, we decided to open source the project and share it with everyone,” said Allan Waddell, Founder and Co-CEO of Kablamo. “Our Kablamo values align strongly with the open source software community and we are proud to play our part in making AWS an even better experience for its users.”

CloudFormation is a native AWS service, which provides the ability to manage infrastructure as code. Kombustion is a CloudFormation pre-processor, which enables AWS users to codify and re-use best practices, while maintaining backwards compatibility with CloudFormation itself.

Kombustion is especially useful where multiple CloudFormation templates are required. It enables developers, DevOps engineers and IT operations teams to reduce rework and improve reusability in the management of CloudFormation templates, whilst also enabling access to best practices via freely available Kombustion plugins.

Liam Dixon, Kablamo Cloud Lead and Kombustion contributor, said while the core functionality has been built, it was essentially a foundation and he hoped the wider AWS community would help make the tool even better.

“Different AWS users have different ways of pre-processing CloudFormation templates, but we saw the opportunity to develop a freely available tool with the potential to become widely used in Australia and overseas,” Dixon said. “Kombustion’s publicly available, plugin-based approach, means that the AWS developer community can reduce rework and share best practices in areas such as security, network design and deploying serverless architectures.”

As well as reducing the time and complexity of managing multiple AWS instances, other Kombustion benefits include:

  • Adoption can be incremental so there is no need to completely rewrite current CloudFormation templates;
  • Kombustion plugins can be installed from a Github repository;
  • Cross-platform functionality means Kombustion works on Linux, FreeBSD and MacOS; and,
  • Kombustion is completely free to use, for both personal and commercial use   

The first release of Kombustion is available for download today at: www.kombustion.io  Kablamo is calling for the AWS community to test and provide feedback on Kombustion, and to contribute towards future iterations of the project.

Buzzword: AI

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In this week's buzzword chat the team tackles how machine learning & AI aren't going to solve your IT woes -- robust discussion ensues.

Ben: Artificial intelligence, yeah?

Liam: Yeah, that and machine learning probably. The coupling of those two as a discrete entity. I need to do the AI.

Marley: A lot of businesses seem to wrap up that they need AI and machine learning when it’s really just about a bad process issue.

Liam: The amount of times we have companies that have a ridiculous amount of data, we've got so much data we don't know roughly how to use it.  And again, they look at some of the technologies that people are doing around machine learning models and sort of the idea of artificial intelligence... again because there are a lot of groups publishing it. When realistically what they really need to do is just start performing data transformation over the top of it and standard data science pieces on it.

Not every solution needs to be in the machine-learning model. A lot of the data points in terms of what they're actually looking to address and find in terms of the data and about their audience, or looking at some of their outcomes in terms of what they're not doing in terms of their product or in their marketing or in their pitch...you don't need to necessarily put that through copious amounts of machine learning or even the idea of creating an AI engine or compute layer to do that. They are probably the two words that get misused the most if we're honest.

Ben: It's not the future everyone thinks it is. Everyone thinks that you're going to ask AI "How do I..." I don't know, "talk to me in a natural way." And every chatbot that I've ever seen is, is utterly terrible. They're not very intuitive. And everyone's going, "Oh, we want that fantastic chatbot experience," but what they really should be aiming for in AI is something that's, you know, solving the customer problem. And yeah, I think it's just been oversold. It's really, really oversold.

Allan: Yeah, but it's rapidly changing. I mean, I think, I think we're rapidly moving towards a place where the Turing test is going to hold. And I think that is, we're talking about 44% of job replacement by, by AI in the next 20 years across Australia.

Liam: That’s more around robotics and machine learning…

Allan: Actually, no. It’s actually not.

Liam: Okay.

Allan: That's not the physical, it's not the white collar, sorry, it's not the blue collar workers that are going to get hit by AI role-replacement first, it's going to be all the white collar. It’s going to be banking, finance in general, and legal.

Liam: What, accountants, really?

Allan: Yes, effectively.  And software developers. Software development as the processes today is going to change rapidly. We deal a lot with the chat services that would apply at a call center or contact center. And I think you're right. It does need to solve the customer problem first, and I think that's where most companies are really behind is the detailed workflows, you know, consistent form that AI would need in order to be effective. And that's going to take some time just to map it out. To be fair, it's like training your replacement. People are going to resist that change. But yeah, in the background it's really that evolution as well of the humanization of those technologies. I can imagine a time, and it's inside our lifetimes, that you're going to pick up the phone and speak to someone and think you're speaking to somebody, and if it doesn't solve the problem it's moot. So yeah, I completely agree.

Ben: The classic example is I know a guy whose name is Paris, and the chatbot says, "What's your name?" He types in "Paris" and then it goes, "Oh, you want to go to France?" And he's like, "No, my name is Paris. You just asked me that." They can’t even do that right so I’m very skeptical.

Allan: It’s got a way to go.

Liam: I think that’s more an implementation issue there. In terms of the context of what it’s capturing or otherwise.

Ben: Ah, maybe. Maybe...

Liam: If you take Alexa and Google Home, I think there’s an element of their chatbot integration, and again some of their machine learning aspects in terms of NLP space. It has done reasonably well, not to say they’re like the be-all end-all.

Ben: Just saying, I’m yet to see any chatbot that impresses me. And I’ve tried them all.

Buzzword: Blockchain

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Listen to the team tackle Blockchain as a buzzword,  current industry uses, what blockchain might look like in the future and the effectiveness of distributed systems (or read the transcript)

Liam: I feel like we’ve missed the absolute elephant in the corner here, which is blockchain.

Allan: Ha. Yeah.

Liam: Let’s try and find something else we can use blockchain to solve...

Marley: I just get sick of seeing LinkedIn profiles that say "I'm a blockchain advocate".

Ben: Or a "blockchain expert." Like really? Did you invent blockchain?

Liam: I sort of feel like it's the thing that everyone attempts to try and find a problem to try and solve with it.

Ben: Solution looking for a problem.

Liam: Yeah. It's one of those things, like it works quite well in the cryptocurrency space, right? In terms of that transaction holding the ledger context of it, I think there's a real essence where banks have attempted to look at it for quite some time. You've got the ASX and a couple other organizations that are looking at how that fits in their platform space. You've got groups like VISA or MasterCard that have come out and been very anti-blockchain in terms of going from a power consumption space. .

Ben: It's one of the three big advancements that we've ever had in accounting. There was single-ledger accounting, a double-ledger, and then there’s blockchain. I think that’s going to have a big impact eventually.

Liam: The question I always wonder is, “Is this like the internet?” Is this the early days of the internet when people are just saying, "They can't necessarily see that far ahead". The idea of going, "Okay, if we could tell the future then we'd all be millionaires in certain aspects." But is it like the internet where it existed in like '98, to what it is today and what we do over it today? Were there that many people back in the '90s talking about eCommerce and web platforms and API-driven aspects? 

Allan: I’ve got very strong feelings about this…

Marley: If you follow the analogy, it's kind of concerning for the future of blockchain, right, because you're going to go again from a distributed system to things like siloed, walled gardens we have today on the internet, right?

Liam: Roughly speaking, yeah?

Marley: I mean it kind of defeats the purpose of technology in the first place.

Liam: How distributed does a distributed system need to be to still be effective? So if you treat the idea of a monopoly as a single ledger, and you say oligopoly is a controlled network. So let's say the banks all start to do blockchain between themselves as they're all the trusted ledgers. But they don't have untrusted ledgers in terms of, "Hey, you could just go and run the blockchain for the bank or be a node within the blockchain of the bank."

Ben: I might be okay with it if I could read the blockchain. At least to PenSpec what’s going on.

Liam: Yeah, you could still inspect it and look for fraud. Maybe with the Royal Commission that’s happening right now, maybe that’s one way to at least get visibility into a banking institution. But does blockchain always have to public? How distributed does a distributed network need to be?

Ben: Well, considering what Facebook's going through, I'd say distributed is a good thing.

Liam: Yeah...data sharing.

 

Architecting Culture at Scale

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Last week, we proudly welcomed Angus Dorney to the Kablamo family.  In his blog post, Angus did an awesome job expressing the significance of his joining, and the much-needed step-change that Kablamo brings to enterprise. We're on the precipice of something new, something great, it's a very exciting time for us.

But thanks to his inherent humility, Angus did a pretty darn average job of expressing one of the more outstanding gifts he brings to us.  Please allow me to explain. 

Angus is known industry-wide for his effectiveness as a tech leader, but what truly distinguishes him in my opinion is his ability to maintain culture at scale.  Angus knows how to grow a business, just Google his name to see a shopping list of distinguished achievements. But he also knows a much more profound thing, how to grow a great culture that matches business growth.  

"Company Culture” these days is 101 level HR marketing fodder, an afterthought. The ideal of company culture is too often tossed around as a concept that sounds great but doesn’t necessarily mean much. 

Kablamo is built around our humans.  We didn’t buy them.  We gravitated together because we share a single vision, we have a single purpose: Deliver cloud software in a way that absolutely knocks the socks off our loyal enterprise customers.  We don’t have dispensable people any more than we have dispensable ethics or values.  Our humans are exceptionally bright and deliver outcomes with unwavering humility. We don’t need or want undeserved monikers like “we’re the best”, “the biggest”, “the fastest”, “the most cloudiest/devopsiest/secopsiest” — we just get on with it. Our team builds really valuable software, we solve problems.  We work really hard, but we maintain balance —and we don’t just say it, we do it. And we enjoy it. 

Our new Co-CEO embodies the ideal of servant leadership. Angus is the safe pair of hands to grow something culturally unique like Kablamo into something much bigger. What’s so critical here is that scaling the Kablamo culture will mean huge benefits for organisations looking for a trusted accountable partner to drive truly valuable enterprise solutions at scale. (Just for fun , try saying that 5 x with a mouth full of marbles)

So, welcome, Angus.  Kablamo’s culture is on the launch pad for the next stage of our journey and the mission is clear.

— Allan Waddell, Co-CEO (Proudly) and Founder Kablamo